Farewell Remarks From Honest Action

Here at Honest Action we believe that freedom of speech is very important in all aspects of society. But when it comes to weighing the good vs. bad of this particular ideal, the bad ultimately outweighs the other. Throughout our weekly postings we explored the idea of having stricter regulations on our media outlets, such as photo shopping or fake news releases. We have also examined advertisers, government officials, and everyday citizens use of hate speech in society.   Our initial intent was to further examine free speech’s extent in today’s world, but in the end we grappled with many different issues that freedom of speech might produce.

We believe in free speech and that everyone should have a voice, and we also see the value in persuasion tactics used by government officials, advertisers and the media. It is easy to understand that these things are often used to promote a business or get a particular job but these goals can be done and should be done honestly and in the way does not offend the people. In today’s society we can often see individuals and organizations use both sides of freedom of speech; while some are positive, progressive, and harmless there are many that are negative, regressive and harmful and these are the messages that need limits. Freedom of speech is what makes America such a land of opportunity and hope, but we also believe that messages have the power to shape the minds of society and can affect individuals directly. We want those individuals to feel protected and we will do this by keeping the public aware and continuing to pass on the message.

So next time you pick up your favorite magazine, or scrolling through your timeline on social media; think about how freedom of speech affects you. Is it really freeing? Or is it all just a facade.

Florida US Senator uses “N” Word

WireAP_22edb3f0af144cb1b49233203850b00d_12x5_1600 A US Senator from Florida was recently ousted for reportedly referring to colleagues by using the n-word to describe them. A representative for Senator Artiles claims that other Senators use similar language and, thus, Artiles should not have to face an investigation on the Senate floor. Majority leader Mitch McConnell cited a decorum rule prohibiting Elizabeth Warren from reading a letter from Coretta Scott King about AG Sessions during his confirmation hearing, as the rule states senators cannot disparage one another on the floor. We at honest action believe these rules should be revised to include disparaging speech off the floor as well.

UCB calls off Ann Coulter

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UC Berkley has canceled a scheduled appearance by conservative pundit, Ann Coulter. This is another lecture by a conservative to be canceled at the university amid safety concerns. Some people are viewing the cancellation as an abridgment of free speech citing that a democrat wouldn’t have been canceled on. Here at Honest Action, we believe the cancellation justified as it was not motivated by party but by safety concerns for the general public.

Types of Lies these Advertisers Tell

In this article by The Balance called Likelihood of Honesty in Advertising Told The Whole Truth written by Paul Suggett discusses the types of lies such as Lie of Commission, Lie of Omission, and Lie of Influence. Suggett explains that lie of commission is a described as a blatant lie and then he compares to advertising strategies and explains that they will never use this form of the lie because of liability. The US legal system prohibits false claims in advertisements so it makes it almost impossible to use lie of commission. He then talks about the lie of omission and this includes the truth but omits an important part of the whole truth. Suggett points to this as advertisers’ bread and butter, they include the positive aspects of the products but purposefully ignore the negative aspects. Then he discusses the last type of lie known as the lie of influence where an accusation aiming for a truth is countered with a positive statement that sways the accuser to look at the accused in a positive light. Advertisers use this strategy when they include celebrities that may have nothing to do with the product but can influence the audience to want to use the product as well. Honest Action is well aware of these lies told by advertising companies to sell their products.
These types of lies were followed by the question “What if Ads Were 100% Honest?” and Suggett lists this as an impossible task followed up with the reasoning that the exaggerations and tactics are used to promote the product in a unique way that interests the consumer. Now, one may think that Honest Action is completely against these tactics and believe that it is unethical to show an AXE commercial where a man tries on the deodorant and is then trampled by beautiful women, but if we’re being completely honest with you, we are ok with some aspects of this marketing. These are creative advertisements where most consumers are aware of the satire and angles being used to sell the product. Our problem comes when advertisers sell their products add editing to the human appearance, to change the consumer’s actual belief in the products ability to do what it was made to do. These are lies that should be illegal when there is not an unreal twist or fantasy as a major part of the ad being shown. Honest Actions does agree that 100% honesty from these ads would not be profitable we still want consumers to be aware and woke.GettyImages-524856956-575749a95f9b5892e82288b6

Thin is In

 

Is it possible to ignore the inevitable? The same thing that’s constantly staring at us and every day reminding us that we’re not good enough to be seen as beautiful is also telling us to not pay attention to our very own looks. Can it be true that I am the vain one that allowed society to place standards and ideologies of beauty upon me?  Buzzfeed editor, Amy Odell writes, “This is what we’re becoming and it needs to stop”.

From protein shakes to low carbs diets with friends. This friendly competition of losing weight has become more than getting bodies toned up for summer, but rather a reason to promote industries to degrade females down to their waist size.

Odell states under her headline that, “What’s worse than retouching is how many OTHER ways the world is telling women how important it is to be thin — and how much women let those messages influence them”. However, these images are bombarding our daily life and it is impossible to simply tolerate their visibility. To say that photoshop isn’t a big deal implies that young women are not strong enough to view the media and disregard messages being sent to them.

Odell also states, “Why does Bethenny Frankel get a free pass to shill as much Skinnygirl this and that as she can manage to license? That whole brand sends the message that other food and beverage and lifestyle brands are, by default, Fatgirl brands”. However, food industries are only complying to further demean women that photoshopping is okay and to measure up to these standards means changing your lifestyle habits and incorporating new “health tips” to stay skinny and appear as models and celebrity endorsers.

Companies are taking advantage of human insecurities and lies showcased by magazine covers to gain product revenue. Not to mention reiterating men’s perspective of how women should eat, dress, and behave.

Here at Honest Action, we recommend women not ignore this issue, but critique the media for shaming audiences into regulating their health habits to fit a more accepting shape. At Honest Action we respect all perspectives and honor truthful views to the public to not misconstrue their body image with unachievable preferences.

Real or Fake??

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After reading this article, you can clearly see that there are some major untrue facts. The controversy of this article makes it unbelievable in an of itself. This is why we believe higher regulations on freedom of speech is necessary. So us Americans do not have to deal with deciphering if an article we are presented with is true or untrue.